You might also like

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Problem solving


Today’s class in problem solving was far less valuable than the last. I looked at photos of problems waiting to happen and was asked to offer solutions. One photo was a child, maybe two, who was standing on a cupboard. No visual clue of how he got there, but what did it matter. Name me a child who has not figured out how to get up and get the good stuff and generally get away with it.

I’ve mentioned that more than half the population of Boston Township lives in my mobile home community. The number of children exceeds the number of children in the other school system. Yet the trustees ignore the needs of the community in favor of the rest of the community. Money may be a factor. Or its obvious absence.

There are almost a hundred children here. Laura is the oldest. She rode her bicycle once this summer. The other children on bicycles swarm the pavement. They race and dare and taunt. Or, they help the smaller ones. All in all, it’s a community of kids responsible for themselves, and doing a decent job of it.

Last night there was an over the handle bars accident when a front tire did not clear a hole. The EMS crew was half an hour getting the child on a board and off to the hospital for treatment of his road rash and stitches in his face. Poor child. He is swollen and cut and miserable today. His name is Nicoli, and he is a scamp. I love him.

I stopped at the library and reiterated to my trustee buddy (not you know who!) the number of people here. I told him what happened to Nicoli last night, and how in his family of several children, one parent is off on another assignment and one keeping house and home together. I’m sure Nicoli is riding a third hand me down bike, and there is not an extra penny in that house for a bike helmet.

I suggested that, at the food drive this year, the trustees put a word in the ear of big donors the need for bike helmets. The manager of the “estate” is willing to provide the names and address of the kids in the park old enough to ride a bike. My trustee friend thought it was a good idea. I may call my other trustee buddy, too.

Now, to get the kids to wear them. Since everything is distributed by police, fire and EMT, I think a little ritual at each house with helmets for kids: raise their right hand and solemnly swear to whatever uniformed official who gives them a helmet  to wear it , because they remember what happened to Nicoli.


Nicoli is shirtless. He and his buddy thought I would bust them for trying to climb the tree. I grinned and gave them a thumbs up, and we've been buddies since.

23 comments:

  1. Little boys are pretty special. Our local and state health department gave out free helmets to kids. Perhaps that would be a good source. The kids loved them as they were pretty colors with decals.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is the law that they should wear bicycle helmets here, but I know it is not heavily enforced. The police, no doubt, have bigger fish to fry. It is always the "street urchins" that I see without the helmets, the kids who are out there at all hours, no supervision, swarming together for lack of anything else to do. I'm glad the little guy was all right. I love your idea of providing helmets - make them cool - some even have a Mohawk feature down the middle! -Jenn

    ReplyDelete
  3. you're living in a microcosm of the world, the wave of the future, hold on to your buddies while you can.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Your voice and determination have changed the lives in the park, even saved them.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I do love your commitment to safety - and fun. I hope the helmet initiative succeeds. And of course a child will find a way onto a cupboard. Particularly if forbidden. By five my youngest brother was climbing onto the roof of various buildings (homes, school, church). His fear of heights came much later.

    ReplyDelete
  6. That sounds like a great idea, Joanne. Helmets do save lives. The pledge sounds like something that would help kids to remember/commit to wear them, too.

    Now how could a person solve that problem if they didn't have problem solving skills, hmm? Ask your cognitive assessment ladies about that.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Sounds like you have a special community!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ahh to be young and reckless but it is our job to keep them safe sometimes not so easy.
    Merle..........

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh I love the photo of the boys; they look like they are thinking " What ? What have we done now ? "
    My three brothers scaled a large wardrobe which fell forward pinning all three on a bed which is where they were found trapped !

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hari om
    You are a champion Joanne...possibly a fairy godmother... YAMxx

    ReplyDelete
  11. Nicoli looks to have the same build my grandson had, skinny but broad shouldered. My grandson is now 5'11". I do hope Nicoli heals quickly and without lasting scars. Having helmets added to food drives is a wonderful idea and I hope the children get them.
    Your problem solving test reminded me of my niece who tried to climb a big old wardrobe in their shed when she was two. It fell on her and broke both her femurs, she had to go back into nappies (diapers) and was in plaster from hips to toes for quite a while. The plaster didn't bother her as much as wearing nappies again. She didn't want people to think she was a baby.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Such a great idea, Joanne. You always think of others, especially children. I admire your spirit!

    ReplyDelete
  13. You sound like a jolly good person to have around that estate Joanne.

    ReplyDelete
  14. The kids in your community are lucky to have you. You may have found another of your life's callings.

    ReplyDelete
  15. sounds like your problem solving skills are working just fine thank you very much, the kid on the counter aside.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! I ordered a helmet for Nickoli. If I can get him to wear it, they'll all fall in line. Hopefully no more headers before Christmas.

      Delete
  16. You never cease to amaze me. Have I told you that you are my hero?

    ReplyDelete
  17. What excellent ideas you have....Why are you not a trustee?

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have to agree with Thickethouse.wordpress. Why AREN'T you a trustee?

    ReplyDelete
  19. Kids and bicycles! This is why I am so rabid about my stop signs and speed limits here. My grandchildren all wear helmets. They are forbidden to ride without them, but most of the kids around here go bare-headed. Makes me cringe. The transient nature of my business makes it hard to correct the matter, but I do like your initiative.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Such a great idea, Joanne. You always think of others, especially children. I admire your spirit!

    โกเด้นสล็อต
    สูตรบาคาร่า
    Gclub จีคลับ



    ReplyDelete
  21. Problem solving consists of using generic or ad hoc methods, in an orderly manner, for finding solutions to problems. Some of the problem-solving techniques ...
    หนังออนไลน์

    ReplyDelete