Monday, October 14, 2019

A bright day, not too cheery

It's hard on fall, calendar be damned. Every morning I wake to wet, either a full rain, or a heavy, dew.



By afternoon and evening, the wet has cleared off and I have only shivering flowers.


This afternoon was a bright, bright day, and I set off to play cards. We still have only three; our newbie was able to come; Nancy is off playing bridge. And, I won by one point, on the last hand. 

In fairness, I was ahead the first several hands, then spent the afternoon in second or third place. The two fellows talked "strategy" all afternoon, then teased me about my silent strategy, winning by one point on the last hand. 

Think what they may, my head no longer holds strategies; only the cards I'm dealt and how to play them without reneging. 

This is the field between the trailer park and the main road.That actually is about half our septic field. It was bright and beautiful today.

I stopped by the golf course on the way home. Here is the lake and a bit of the tree in my header. There have been no golfers all summer. 

Weekend news was the opening of the new visitor center for the park, on Main Street in old Boston, and the purchase of the golf course by the Conservancy. The purchase agreement is signed; a lot of the money still must be raised.


More unkempt grounds further along the golf course.


 And more unmowed grounds. I think about the grass that stays green and the grass that grows tall, brown and shaggy. I don't know anyone expert enough in golf course technology to explain the difference. Perhaps Geo. is reading and will explain.


Back home at day's end, one of the last mandevilla blooms. This weekend probably will be their end.


My list of errands for tomorrow includes a drive down to Boston Park, to see what damage may have happened to the Park. This is the People's Park, dating to earlier than the Great Depression, built and maintained by Boston's residents on the scraps of road right of way. It is important to Boston, and I'm curious what care the National Park has exercised. 

26 comments:

  1. The mandevilla bloom looks a bit like a sunnyside up egg. :)

    You've gorgeous skies and green views at the moment and they look lovely.

    I'd be keen to see photos of People's Park, if you decide to take any.

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    1. Yes, and I'll give you a link to a short piece about the park.

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    2. I was going to say that! It made me want breakfast.

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  2. Your mandevillas sure are gorgeous!

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  3. Hari OM
    Keeping your finger on the pulse of happenings in the community as ever - I too will be interested in the park goings on. The golf course does now look rather forlorn... YAM xx

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  4. I love brightly coloured flowers which hang on into Autumn -- they are even more appreciated because I know soon they will be gone, gone, gone again until Spring.

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  5. I didn't really know about the Boston Township Park until I just looked it up at http://www.bostontownship.org/bostonpark.phtml and found the piece you wrote about it.
    I wonder if Mike Zorena is the Mike Zorena that was a police officer in Bath until a few years ago. His daughter Jennifer was in a Sunday school class with my daughter Emily.

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  6. Mandevillas are perennials in Perth: we leave them to their own devices and almost forget about them!

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  7. That last mandevilla looks a bit like a fried egg :)
    I never learned to play cards apart from Snap, or the very simplest form of solitaire, but I am sorry you've lost the ability for strategies.

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  8. Love the sunny side up mandevilla. And am glad that you won at cards (strategy or not).

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  9. Super photos. I haven't mowed my lawns for a month.

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  10. The flowers will be missed this winter.

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  11. That's a lovely field between the trailer park and the main road. I'd like to have something as wonderful as that behind my house!

    How come the golf course has had no golfers all summer? What's putting them off?

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  12. I am also wondering like Nick why no golfers. I know it gets muggy there but people still golf here in the extreme heat. Maybe that is why no golfers if it was in the process of being sold. Beautiful field! So very picturesque. Cards are a good way to keep the brain active.

    Betty

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  13. My peach Mandevillas will be taken down this weekend. They weren’t as pretty as yours and suffered from our terrible hot and wet weather.

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  14. Such pretty views you have and nice flowers, rain and chill nonwithstanding. We also have wet mornings - with humidity dew and very warm temperatures - ugh.

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  15. I hope the park is doing okay.

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  16. your fourth defected for bridge? I'm surprised your trailer park is all on septic. it affords a great view though. it's nice that the golf course has been left to revert to nature. what does the Conservancy plan to do with it? as for the grass, my guess is that some grass is perennial like st. augustine and whatever it is they plant on golf courses and some is annual like the various hay and ornamental grasses.

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    1. There is no municipal sewer in the township. No sewer lines laid, no water, either. It will be a tough go to enter the 21st century. Everyone must keep their septic up to standard. If a septic system fails, the state requires replacement with a mini waste treatment plant, costing big bucks. Thirty, forty grand.

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  17. Lovely views Joanne - and i love that white flower with a yellow centre - looks like an egg.

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  18. The grass in the middle is called the fairway. The longer grass on the edges is called the rough. Is that helpful?

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    1. I wonder what is the genre of the seed. Kentucky blue grass for the green, something else for the rough.

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  19. My first thought about that white flower was also that it looks like a fried egg :)

    Our flowers are shivering here, too. But my peas are still blooming and producing, although slowly and not in great quantities. We didn't have a nice fall; the cold weather came at the end of August and stayed.

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