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Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Keppra, please



My head is spinning, literally, and almost actually.

Cast your mind back fifty or more years. How did demonstrations happen? I remember a constant sense of awareness. Walking to class, seeing an “activist” acquaintance. “Hey, man, the word is out…”, and so forth. We weren’t radical, we just were students who could walk into a group of acquaintances and find ourselves walking down the middle of a street, arms locked, chanting.

After my disappointing conversation with Laura last night, and another restless night, I went out to breakfast. Before I left, a flurry of texts with Deb, who was “in on it,” and Pam, who I hoped to recruit. I told them Hudson would be tough; we’d have to be out on the sidewalk, and where to park? I said I’d call the Peninsula police chief and ask his advice.

On the way to breakfast, I called one of the two trustees remaining from my tenure.  It came to me, what is more Mom and Apple Pie than a protest in the middle of Peninsula. He had no problem with 303 and Riverview, outside the town hall, except for visibility, and suggested a couple more conspicuous spots. But, at ten in the morning it’s not visibility. Traffic is gone. It’s media coverage.

I pitched protest to Lynn, over pancakes and bacon. She loves me dearly and turned me down flat. She could not bear the idea of her picture in the paper.

I called the other trustee. She was all for it, and will be there. We can park in the town hall, because it’s “the normal course of business.” 

I called the last trustee, who did not run for re-election, and is not for having his guns confiscated. He did agree magazines could be smaller, background checks better, assault rifles banned, and, yes, he would come after all. 

I called the police chief. He put it on their calendar, not a problem.

I began emailing the press. We have three newspapers of note. By the time I hit the last send, I heard from the first paper, in Hudson. “Didn’t you used to be in Boston? What’s this protest all about?” Like he hadn’t heard of the National School Walkout. It was an adversarial interview, to say the least. I said we were protesting nothing, we were standing for something. He said to take a picture and send it. I said send a reporter or miss it.

The Akron paper hopes to feature it in a local story of all the protests. I told her I was available to answer questions.

I was invited to attend tomorrow’s trustee meeting and pitch the Walk Out to the third paper, that covers our meetings, as well as our new Fiscal Officer, who takes the minutes and updates the web pages.

I posted on Facebook and Twitter.

I still have two weeks and a lot of local citizens to get involved.

And signs to have printed.



27 comments:

  1. Glad to hear that your life has a new purpose. Who better to organize than someone who's been through it before.

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  2. "Don't mourn, organize!" And you know how! Good for you, Joanne, show 'em how it's done. I hope your courage and that of the other demonstrators will inspire people not to be complacent or afraid of public opinion.

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  3. You're going great! All success to you all...live in hope and organize well

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  4. Hari OM
    this is the work you needed to take up that slack time!!! wwohoo - go gal... YAM xx

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  5. Joanne, you are an inspiration. Those granddaughters of yours will be telling tales of you for years to come.

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  6. You are my hero. If I was able I'd be right there with you. In spirit I will be there.

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  7. you put us all to shame Joanne! I'm not an organizer. if I was there I'd be standing with you though. perhaps the signs could say something about time for common sense gun regulations or 2nd amendment calls for guns to be well regulated.

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  8. You are so dedicated, I admire your strength of will.

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  9. You go girl. I would come join you if you weren't so far away.

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  10. I'm not a very good organizer so you've impressed me all to bits. But I'm a joiner and if I was there I'd be with you.

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  11. I marched but was so afraid. Nixon had a bad guy list just for college students, and I was on it. But I marched. I protested the war and marched for civil rights. Now that I can't walk far, you can find me protesting online.

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  12. Oh wow! You are so awesome, Joanne! Good for you! I wish I was still teaching and could help take part in this with the school. I so admire you!

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  13. Replies
    1. I was just reading about the school walk-outs that are going to take place in my area. They are just for the students and personnel. No parents are to come. This is for safety and security reasons. On March 24th, there will be a March for our Lives being held in Washington and cities and towns all over the country.

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  14. The signs look impressive. I hope you get the coverage you want and that more people either turn up or walk past and decide to join you. I really hope this makes a difference and gets the attention of those who need to act to make that difference. I hope that makes sense.

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  15. I think a lot of people are afraid to put their head above the parapet these days, for fear of a huge backlash. I hope you get plenty of people on the walkout.

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  16. Way to go Joanne! If I was close, and if I could walk, I'd be with you.....I'll be there in spirit.

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  17. With you in spirit! The answer is so obvious, I have trouble with his supporters who won't even try to listen to reason. Wish I could join you in person!!

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  18. I left a comment after Tom, but it's vanished. I said that a lot of people are afraid to put their head above the parapet these days for fear of a backlash. I hope you get plenty of support for the walk-out.

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