Thursday, June 16, 2022

Trail of breadcrumbs

Two pieces closer to solving the pain puzzle. At the beginning of this week the rheumatologist appointment finally came around. She was located in the next county north, and I did not enjoy the trip! It was the first available appointment, and she was most helpful. 

I learned there is no cure for osteoarthritis pain. There are therapies for relief, but no end to the pain except nsaids, steroids, narcotics and joint replacements. I will never be a candidate for a voluntary joint replacement, I no longer can take nsaids, and no rheumatic practice can prescribe any narcotic tier of drugs. I've known that last for years; it is why I have a pain management doctor.

This doctor wanted to sweep me into her practice, but I told her No. I have an endocrinologist who started me on the Reclast road, and I have a primary care doctor to steer me to other doctors. Once to Cuyahoga County to see a doctor was plenty for me.

So, that was rheumatology. Today I had an appointment for a massage with a highly recommended practitioner, for the IT band problem. I've had massages in my life, and this was unlike any previous. He explained his method is to retrain the brain from its paths of pain and back into its normal activities. I'll try anything once.

I can only compare his technique to Shake, Rattle and Roll. He shook and rattled most of my limbs to the point of feeling rubbery. Much more of me than I thought needed the shake down. The IT band loosened and eight hours later is still close to pain free. I'll see how it feel tomorrow.

That leaves me only my pain management part of the problem. My opiod prescriptions run for two months before renewal. Last month I asked the doctor to switch me from Belbuca, a tab that dissolves in my mouth, to Buprenorphine, a skin patch good for a week. The difference between them is financial. Belbuca costs me $300 per month; Bupren costs $100.  However, it is not nearly as effective as Belbuca. 

So, I will spend the money.

I am about three weeks out from my next pain management appointment, and I'll wait. Changing appointments, if even possible, only messes up the opioid powers that be, causing delays in receiving scripts. It makes me wonder why, if it is so difficult to be sold a prescription, why so many Ohioans are dying from opioid overdoses.

Red, if you are interested in the massage I had today, I'll ask the practitioner for the name of his method.

28 comments:

  1. Hari om
    While not one hundred percent the answers and resolutions, it seems that you are definitely better off at this end of the week than you were at the beginning - at least that's how I read this. The limb recalibration techique sounds fabulous! Here's to more success from that. YAM xx

    ReplyDelete
  2. Doctors were fast and free with opioids thanks to the pharmaceutical company that was making millions off it poo pooing any addiction problems. Then everyone turned out to be addicted. Oops, no more opioids so now those unfortunates just turn to fentanyl and heroin and overdose. I'm glad the massage gave you some relief. It will probably have to be a regular thing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I am resigning myself to living with a certain pain and hope to take care of the other one with surgery.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm glad you got some relief. Let's hope it continues to help.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm glad the massage helped! I hope its good effects last for awhile. Good idea to go back to the more expensive pain medication. You deserve as much relief as you can get.

    ReplyDelete
  6. That sounds like a fascinating massage technique. Here's hoping it's still working tomorrow and the days after.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I do hope that massage continues to work tomorrow and for the days to come. I am crossing my fingers tightly.

    ReplyDelete
  8. The massage sounds like a winner; could it become part of your routine? Those medications are indeed expensive but you need one that works, even if it's pricey.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Yes, what Ellen said...and now folks who really need pain meds are told to take advil and tylenol...Gone are the days of morphine in elixir- Mostly due to $$$ and greed in the industry. Glad to hear about the massage, that sounds promising.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Oh, outstanding!!! So wonderful to know the massage helped immediately! Nothing like immediate relief (whether fully or partially, a bit of help is better than none at all). I may have to go see a chiropractor before this move business is over and done with.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I’m another who uses a chiropractor for my back problem- sadly your problems are more complex so I don’t think one would help you….but then you’ve tried so many treatments you never know what will and what won’t.

    ReplyDelete
  12. How interesting that the Shake, Rattle, and Roll method helped! Lets hope it continues to be helpful. I have a lot of trouble with osteoarthritis, especially in both knees and I can't take nsaids either. The joys of aging. But in your case you have had far beyond any one person's quota of pain.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I'm very glad the massage was effective and hope it stays pain free now.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I hope the pain will indeed be less and less.

    ReplyDelete
  15. The massage sounds good..and our bodies do learn patterns with pain which need changing. Hope that works for you xx

    ReplyDelete
  16. Pain is very hard to assess from the outside. I believe your practitioner who says he controls it by using the brain pathways. One clue is to compare the level of pain experienced when it is self-inflicted or accidental with that of being tortured by another human being. Pain inflicted by someone else is always a lot worse. I suppose it's understandable, but it's very sad to think that is the way it works.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I am eternally grateful for universal medical coverage for all.

    ReplyDelete
  18. A proper massage can work wonders.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I am thinking that your therapist is a Trager trained therapist. I've experienced what it can do to release stored pain and it is short of a miracle! It's goal is to re-train the brain so it can help the body release some very deep stuff - both physical and emotional. So happy that it worked for you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. I looked it up and agree. My therapist said he learned in Indiana, but I don't recall him telling me its name. I still hurt today, but far less.

      Delete
    2. It's an odd-feeling type of therapy, yet clearly, it has some benefits. My first experience was a "What the hell?" kind of thing, but marveled at the feeling that my insides were massaged as well as my outsides. It also stimulated a sort of mental release that was scary, but when done, felt quite soothing.

      Delete
  20. As with everyone else here, I am glad that the massage therapy gave you some relief and that it can become a part of your regime.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I hope the massage continues to help. I believe it helps with many problems.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hope the massage helps. No there are no cures for arthritis, but some therapies can be beneficial. Have you ever had acupuncture? I haven't but have heard from some folks how much they think it helps. I get pretty regular exercise and massages and visits to the Chiropractor which all help; but mine isn't Rheumatoid. Best of luck to you. Got you added to my blog list.
    Sandy's Space

    ReplyDelete
  23. If the new massage therapy works to eliminate pain, it's a winner and you must continue. I'd continue with the pain medication until you and only you know they are not needed. So often, as individuals, we have to take steps to solve our own problems. Going outside traditional medicine (thinking) often provides good results. Good work Joanne!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Joanne - osteoarthritis is the reason for my lack of mobility - ankles, hip and knee - also fingers. My mother had it very badly too. Thank goodness I have little pain when sitting and none in the night - it is just swollen, stiff and malformed joints. My only pain killer is paraacetamol and I read that there was no point in taking paracetamol for osteo so I tried leaving it off for a week. By the end of the week I could literally hardly move around at all. So back on them again.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I do hope the massage continues to be effective and giving you relief. I follow your journey with self-interest due to my own dancing (ha!) on the fine line of pain meds and suffering.
    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  26. Did the massage change things? Did the change last?

    ReplyDelete