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Friday, November 10, 2017

A few more pictures


This morning I had an appointment with the new neurologist. I’d love to give up the lot of them, except my primary care would turn on me, and I do like her. She loves to scroll her computer and say “Your cardiologist says….”, or “when did you last see the eye doctor?” She stunned me when I asked if anyone would ever learn the blood flow through my calcified carotid and she said “Oh, just a minute. That came with the scan from George Washington…”

Standard procedure for unconscious patients seems to include a head to toe scan, these days. I’ve had several doctors look at the scan results and answer a question for me.


I left for the appointment and found snow. I went into the valley, crossed the river, came up the other side into Fairlawn, and found a blizzard. Well, heavy snow. The ground is warm, the roads are warm, it won’t stick. It’s simply the fact of it falling. Annoying, as Laura would say. And certainly not the day for pictures.



I took the two pictures above three years ago, 2014. This is the old Black farm, on Wetmore.  The National Park has renamed it Briar Rose Farm. That's because they have allowed to farm house to be totally overgrown by brambles, so they invent a new history for it. 


Yesterday: the gate is open, the chain and lock no longer on the gate.


The upper loft door is open to the weather, as is the lower door. The barn needs painted to protect the wood.


The gutter no longer has a downspout. Vegetation is overtaking the barn. The roof still needs painted.


Whoops, there's the downspout.


The foundation does seem recently sealed.


I tried this picture six ways to breakfast. I love this weed. You can make out the stem, but the large flower head, gone to seed, is hard to make out.  For 360 degrees around the picture the landscape was too brown to show off the flower head.


A nice fall tree, further down the road.


28 comments:

  1. I suppose the idea of neglecting the farm is because nature is supposed to take over, but it still seems a shame.

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    1. A working equestrian farm. There's a long, low horse barn to the right of the small barn. Too overgrown now to get a picture. Just a piece of the park the NPS was putting together.

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  2. Great photos. Hate seeing specialists, rather my internist would deal with it all.

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  3. I love the fence photo. I'm wondering if we'll get snow this weekend. It's supposed to go down to the teens, so it's cold enough for it. I'm not ready after the warm fall we've had. Suppose I'd better get ready, though.

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  4. It makes me sad to see a barn slowly decay. Its history? The lives spent in working there?

    You have a way of capturing simple beauty.

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  5. Nice pics, I like the metal roof. Cary and I had one, in '70 or so, in Oregon. Loved the sound of rain at night....we'd lay there and smile at each other. So many years.....

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  6. Hari OM
    Being off farming blood, it pulls at my heart to see this neglect... there is a beauty to be found, but it is a sad one. I love that 'weed', and the fence against which it is set. Brrrrr... snow.... YAM xx

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    1. A friend says it will "bloom" again with a cap of snow. I'll go back then.

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  7. Colder than a witch's tit up there I see on the weather map. Maybe tomorrow. Snow makes pretty pictures too.

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  8. Budget cuts for the NPS? Do they offer any explanation for not restoring the buildings?

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    1. They don't have the money. They have owned my township, basically since 1975, by eminent domain and some serious shenanigans. But as the former director of the park said to me, "No visitor's stay will be enhanced by knowing 400 people lost their homes!" As we say, if you pass a piece of land with daffodils blooming in the spring, someone once had a home there.

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  9. Gorgeous photos. And yes, add me to the long list of those mourning the neglected. It is some years since I have seen a neurologist, and I am happy with that.

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  10. Fall has its own beauty with its browns and greys. The weathered red of the barns fits right in. A few flakes of snow here tonight, but only a few.

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  11. It's sad to see old places gradually disintegrating, and odd I think to rename it. The last picture is glorious.

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  12. Great photos, Joanne.

    I hate to see the old farms go ruin!

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    1. I think it's a sin analogous to abandoning an animal.

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  13. It is always sad to see abandoned places, we don't have much here because the country is so small.

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  14. Fading beauty but makes a good photo opportunity x

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  15. To everything, there is a season. Lovely pictures, Joanne.

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  16. It does not take long for nature to claim abandoned or neglected places, especially anything "viney". -Jenn

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  17. only three years and it looks like that now? the National Park isn't taking very good care of the property.

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  18. Winter photos aren't easy. The snow is best after a major fall, but it' hard to get around. At other times it is cold and windy.

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  19. Of all the photos, I like the fall tree the best.

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  20. You got about the same amount of snow as we did. It looked worse than it was in the end. Some ol' trees are just hanging in here too.

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  21. There is just something so appealing to pictures of old farms!

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