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Saturday, October 26, 2013

Emily's Job




Emily has been employed for wages since she was thirteen years old. Leaving her five dollar an hour stocking job at the corner candy story was a concern when she moved here, but relieved by receipt of an allowance. I once overheard her say to Hamilton, "Remember, we get a regular allowance now." No idea what concerned him; nice his little sister knew the answer.

I took the two of them around to all the local employers last February. They put in applications at the nursery and all the restaurants. The only employer skipped was Heritage Farms; we just missed on connecting. Hamilton, Emily and Laura spent most of the summer in volunteer jobs. 

Toward the end of summer, leaving her library job, Emily asked how near we were to Heritage Farms, and could we just go by. This time we got lucky and caught Carol coming out her kitchen door. She and Emily went back in the farmhouse for an interview. Emily came out with a stack of employment papers to fill out and return. She was hired.

Miss Emily spent the last six weeks at hard physical labor, just another one of the local youngsters. The farm's first fall event is Pumpkin Pandemonium. The crew cleared the hayride trail. They built a corn maze.



Not all October weekends have been warm and sunny. Emily has spent shifts in the rain. "It's OK, Gramma. We worked in the barn today."



The barn with the fireplace to keep warm. I believe I have not mentioned the portable toilets. But at nine in the morning of cold Saturdays and Sundays, she was off up the path to the barn, in her sturdy work boots.




Pumpkin Pandemonium with rows and rows of pumpkins for children to select and parents to carry away. I took these pictures when I arrived at closing time and the grounds were clearing.


The last day she worked Pumpkin Pandemonium the farm closed early. Rain. Emily hustled down the path when she saw her carriage in the parking area. And didn't lose a boot on the way.

Next weekend they will take down and store all the pumpkin event trappings and start the preparations for Christmas trees. She's already walked all the "cut your own" fields, tagging trees ready to cut. She loves it. I can't imagine using a portable toilet in sub freezing weather. Gumption and a good pair of boots can take you a long way.


31 comments:

  1. What a great job for a young person!

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  2. Well done Emily. Well done all of them. You have grandchildren to be proud of.

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  3. You are one tough Grandma! The good thing is we will all reap the dividends of your tough love. Could you clone yourself?

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  4. What a nice stacked stone chimney, working for wages at a young age instills the work ethic for life. to this day I am bored if I don't have a project or job to do.

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  5. Hmmm, sounds like Emily is a lot like her Grandma!

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  6. You are teaching them a great work ethic and the value of a dollar....lessons thast will stand them in good stead for the rest of their lives.

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  7. Gumption, a great set of boots and an even better Grandma. The three G grounding - a wonderful basis for the future.

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  8. These grandchildren of yours seem to be cut of the same cloth, I love hearing the adventures. I love that you love showing them the way.

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  9. Isn't it great that she gets down and gets on with it...no moaning from that girl.

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  10. That sounds like a great job,when you are young it would be so much fun.
    Merle..............

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  11. Good for Emily!! Sounds like a fun place to work too, despite the weather conditions!

    betty

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  12. How wonderful--a great experience.

    Using a porta-potty when it is near freezing? I am with you.

    p.s. Watching the weather channel; are you getting snow?

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    Replies
    1. A mere ten miles north schools and roads closed. May the prevailing winds not shift....

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  13. I bet Emily is having a ball and it is a bonus that she is getting paid also for her efforts.

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  14. Replies
    1. On the way home, after one of those bone chilling days, Emily said "Well, this is not the last job I'll ever have."

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  15. A Johnny on the spot in sub zero temps...are you sure she's not Canadian?
    Jane x

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    Replies
    1. See above.
      Grandma is smiling and saying little.

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  16. A tough young lady - she'll do well.

    In agreement on the refrigerator toilet. Had to use one of those when my daughter was horseback riding her final year. Although I must say it beat the alternative of the previous years, which was - do without.

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  17. Hari OM
    Willingness and fortitude. I like the girl. Blessings. YAM xx

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  18. Gumption and a good pair of boots. I'll keep that in mind as my great nephew grows.
    I feel proud of Emily, she's made of sturdy hard working stock.

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  19. She's a good girl & a credit to you & herself.

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  20. what a great job. how old is Emily? My twin grandgirls are ready to get jobs, want jobs so they can have some money as they don't get an allowance, something I don't agree with but their parents struggle financially. I give the kids money when I can. anyway, back to the girls wanting to get a job, they are only 15 and you have to be 16 here.

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    Replies
    1. Emily is 14. She would need a work permit for any other job she applied for, but this is classed farm labor. I don't know much about the classification. My daughters had to get work permits to get jobs when they were 14.

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  21. It sounds like a *great job* for a young person (hard, but fun). My grandson is 14 (almost 15) and would like to work next summer. I'm not sure but I thought you had to be 16 for most jobs around here also.

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  22. It is wonderful they have learned such a good work ethic. CC could not find work at college. It was very distressing. She did work this past summer.

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  23. Here in the UK you can't work until 16 -- with the exception of delivering newpapers. And, unlike the States, there don't seem to be part time after school and weekend jobs for those in school. I've often thought this a pity as I know I learned a lot about having a good work ethic at that age, not to mention responsibility.

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  24. Emily has grit. Some do and some don't and you can spot it nearly right away. She will never go hungry with a will like that.

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  25. Your granddaughter has a strong work ethic -- this will be an asset for her as she goes through life. And what a lovely place to work. Especially at Halloween time! -- barbara

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  26. Like the other commenters, I'm impressed by Emily's work ethic and genuine DESIRE to get out there, earn money, do a good job. She's exactly the kind of person I want to see show up in my college classes!

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  27. You must be so proud of Emily. Good for her. I'm really enjoying the Midwest fall festivities. I've kept it a secret about being away from home on my blog because my brother has warned me that we can never know who is reading it and we've had too much crime in the islands.

    Emily will really value her college experience even more knowing she helped pay for it.

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