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Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Today's loom adventure

 
Today we spent six hours driving to Van Wert and back, because I am determined to keep collecting up my weaving pieces parts. We went for the spool rack. Van Wert is just before Toledo, and the location of Leesburg Loom, where I had the custom spool rack built.

It was a beautiful day for a drive, and I treated Laura to some trucker lore I learned from my brother-in-law. On US and Interstate highways, there are many holding ponds. Tom's story for these is, the next feature of the highway is an overpass. The highway engineers struck up agreements with farmers on the way, and in exchange for the pond used the dirt from it to build the overpass embankments. Probably a true story.






There is farm after farm along US 30. It was small talk, and the driver was amused!




We reached 301 North Cherry Street, and picked up the rack, unassembled.  Out the door, forty seven dollars and change, plus a tank of gas. The fancy schmancy, huge spool racks from name brand loom companies start at two hundred dollars. I had one, that I gave away. It was too heavy and bulky for my hands to manage.


Van Wert is so typically German settlement that we put the GPS on pause and drove around downtown. That's city hall.The little white building caught my eye. I didn't see any description of function. Around here, if it wasn't a school house, it was a Grange Hall, and I bet the latter, to be associated with a GAR cannon. GAR: Grand Army of the Republic. 


More history. I don't understand the meaning of this sign; we were on US 30, and the Lincoln Highway is US 30, through much of this country, including Ohio. I don't understand the exit sign, unless someone neglected to put up "Old US 30 signs." A mystery.


Back home, and a spool rack to assemble. Forty pegs and the foot assembly. We were one Amish supplied peg short, so tomorrow it's off to Ace Hardware for a replacement.


This job needed a socket set, or at least a crescent wrench. Laura says we do not have one, which I find hard to believe, but am too tired to go rifle the tool chest in the shed. Tomorrow, before we go to Ace will be the moment of truth.


So, my forty peg rack, assembled. I see the feet are on backward. The spools of thread pull with a mighty force, and need to pull against the solid part of the cross brace. I guess that's worth a crescent wrench!

When I read the email tonight, my cone of thread shipped today, for delivery by Friday night. Life is good.

27 comments:

  1. Wow.
    Love your helper and cannot begin to say how happy I am to hear that 'Life is good.'

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  2. A nice adventure! That’s quite a city hall!

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  3. I have the identical crescent wrench. What an amazing country you live in. The long drives to get things would be - to me - part of the adventure. I remember driving 15 miles in the U.S. for groceries, and I loved every mile.

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    1. I think I drove across Britain and back today. Well, a skinny part. Yes, the trip always is part of the adventure, at lease for me!

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  4. Laura is becoming quite proficient in any number of areas, isn't she? Good for both of you for making sure of that. I had to Google crescent wrench to find that it's what we call an adjustable wrench. Or did you mean something different?

    Count me as another who is glad to read "life is good"!

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  5. What fun! I am glad you have Laura to help you with this! Makes it much less of a chore!

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  6. An interesting and worthwhile road trip!

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  7. A beautiful day for a road trip and some discoveries. Best of luck with all the new weaving.

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  8. You live in amazing country, here you can not drive 6 hours without crossing the border.

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  9. So that's a spool rack. Looks like a handy item, you could use it for other things, like scarves or ties, aprons maybe, once you are no longer weaving, IF that day ever comes.

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  10. So much more satisfying..and interesting..to go and collect something, than sit and wait for the delivery that may,or may not arrive when promised!

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  11. Hari OM
    Well done the pair of you! Fascinating fact, attractive architecture and handy helpers make for life being good... YAM xx

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  12. I remember my mother setting off on long journeys like this to collect spare parts for lorries that my father would find via haulier magazines and off Mum would go, with me and sometimes youngest brother, to get it home in time for father to fit it overnight. Our journeys were pretty much into the unknown of industrial England from the farmland of the East. Mum, and all of us, took it in our stride. I am glad to see you and Laura doing much the same. I enjoyed the post and for the memories it brought back for me.

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  13. There were countless times my husband and I drove from the southern tier of NYS to northern Indiana to see family. Once a year, at least. We always drove on the toll road, taking that bypass under Cleveland once we discovered it. Driving through Cleveland was harrowing. However, as a child my family drove from Indiana to near Seattle, using U.S. 30 most of the way. 2,235 miles of America. It was memorable.

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    1. Laura - that girl can do anything.

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    2. My parents drove us from Ohio to the Rockies and back a couple of times, as childhood vacations. No interstates then, though Eisenhower was working on them, and so was my dad, telling me the real purpose of highways was to move armies.

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  14. love that Laura is growing into a totally self-sufficient woman. of course she has a totally self-sufficient woman for a mentor.

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  15. A magnificent city hall and a very happy driver! A good day all round.

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  16. And you had a driver and assembler. Life is good. Can't wait to see and buy some towels.

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    Replies
    1. Well, the driver caved at the first rest area, ninety minutes or so out. But, not a problem.

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  17. Life is very good when you love weaving.

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  18. You'll have those dish towels in no time. I used the time in the car to try to teach my children too. They were a captive audience.

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  19. I love old hwy signs. Old Highway 395, Old Hwy 66, Old Hwy...Great adventures as long as your cell works and your car has gas. Looking forward to more weaving adventures.

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  20. Joanne, I just wanted to stop by to let you know that your wonderful woven tea towels are used and appreciated here, every single day.
    Elaine
    (formerly Pear Tree Log)

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