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Friday, May 4, 2018

Never again!

I've used seven days and one granddaughter to put the most minimal warp in existence on this loom. Laura wound seven yards of warp, and I calculated seven towels from that. You've stuck with me through threading the chains through the reed, then the heddles (totally ass backwards!).  Here's the rest of the story.


This afternoon I painstakingly tied thirty bouts to the back beam, and waited for Laura to return from school. We commenced the job of transferring seven yards from the front of the loom to the back. Yes it was a tangled mess. Each of us had a comb devoted to combing it out. I think no thread broke.


We spent about three hours putting about five yards of warp on the back beam, where it belongs. We ran out of cardboard separating sheets. Thank goodness.


I tied up the breast beam and wove the idle weave--the part that evens up the tie on bouts and leaves the job ready to go.


Two yards of warp in the trash. Ask me if I care!  I probably can empty this loom over the weekend. I take delivery of a new to me, real loom on Wednesday. Hallelujah. 


On the way to the ice cream stand, look! The pear tree has leaves.







33 comments:

  1. Weaving looks sooooooooo complicated! But it does result in a beautiful end product.

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  2. No different than your cards. Time and practice. Life is learning.

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  3. I have weavers from Paisley (Scotland) as well as silk workers from Ireland as ancestors - but this all looks and sounds so complicated to me

    Then as you say - time and practice is the key. The very words I say to those who talk about my knitting which the same as those who can crochet beautiful garments say to me (a non crocheter) when I marvel at their creations

    Take care Joanne - yes life is for living and learning. Never give up on either of them.

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  4. Oh it all too complicated but I do know what it is like when you have sewing equipment that doesn't work properly or function as it should even if it works. So frustrating. I hope your new loom is much more friendly :-)

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  5. I'm not sure I would cope with an unfamiliar loom again...

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    Replies
    1. Such different brain cells and muscle groups required!

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    2. Oh so true...my last was originally an Ulster silk loom. It took me a time to get to grips with it but it spoiled me for anything else.

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  6. Wow. My mother taught herself bobbin lace and that looked complicated (was complicated) and did my head in. Your work does too on a bigger scale.

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  7. What did I miss Joanne? A new loom? So glad spring has arrived there.

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  8. Well you tried and it was a worthy effort. Thankfully the new loom will arrive shortly. In the meantime, such beautiful spring blossoms!

    betty

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  9. Hari om
    ...the leaves? Leaves was the first thing you noticed on the pear tree? Okay.

    Now then - important bit _NEW LOOM!!! Yaay :-)
    YAM xx

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  10. There's so much work that goes into weaving, I couldn't do it that's for sure. Does Laura have enough interest to keep learning?

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  11. I don't know how much of this I understand, but it seems like quite the process.

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  12. I just remembered: My college where I did sculpture (sometimes) had the biggest and best weaving and textiles department in England, including the North. They had looms in there as big as trucks. It was in Farnham, Surrey. I wonder if it still exists?

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    1. Weaving had a huge Renaissance in the last return to nature, back when we did it. Now two large universities by me have discontinued their textile programs and the equipment has drifted into the universe.

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  13. The language of weaving impresses me. I have no idea what any of it means! Happy weaving, Joanne!

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  14. The mind boggles at what is involved in weaving cloth...I haven't got my mind around knitting yet and all it involves is two pins lol.

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  15. Joanne, I am so happy to see you at the loom again! Hope it goes well and more importantly, THAT YOU LIKE IT!

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  16. Oh, Joanne, I'm so glad you're weaving. Weaving has kept me sane, and kept my brain from petrifying, for over 4 decades. Two yards in the trash? No biggie. You can always buy more yarn. You can't buy more time.

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    Replies
    1. That always was the mantra--it's only thread!

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  17. Such nimble fingers required but it must be so satisfying. So looking forward to seeing how it's done.

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  18. I have often wondered about weaving I have a friend who does it but maybe stick to painting.
    Merle.........

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  19. this makes me appreciate your towels even more, so amazing your patience and dedication

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  20. So interesting to see how it all works.

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  21. You and Laura have such patience!

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  22. I'm thinking now of pear ice cream. :)
    Happy New to You Loom!

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  23. You aee so funny. If you grow tired of weaving again, don't get rid of your loom again.

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    Replies
    1. I have few regrets in my life, Mage, but giving all that away is one. On the other hand, I'm keeping the economy moving!

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  24. Oh gosh! I thought knitting was impossible to learn. Weaving is in a whole 'nother ballpark.

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  25. It is thrilling to see that weaving is in your life again!!

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