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Thursday, October 27, 2016

Change of address


I have lived here since July 4th. That represents four monthly paychecks. Finally this morning I changed my address at work. As the person who closes the year, issues W-2’s, and does all that other tedious stuff that interests no one, except in its absence, I may have noticed it in December.

I did change my address with the post office, and important people like Visa. Then my address began updating itself. Social Security Administration sent me a letter telling me the post office had informed them of my new address, and if I was not the person at the new address on the notification, please let them know.

Junk mail arrived with my new address. My health insurance statement of benefits arrived at my new address as if it had always been.  On the one hand, it seemed seamless. On the other, some digital machine knows too much.

I did change my address with the Board of Elections. The other day I produced my driver’s license as photo ID, and saw my old address. I renewed that license on my birthday this year, and it’s valid until 2020. It expires March 31, 2020, the last day of my current term in office. I like that.

Renewing or replacing a driver’s license costs, I think, thirty five dollars. The license I renewed for thirty five dollars last March will cost me another thirty five dollars to replace with my new address. We must produce picture identification in order to vote in a couple of weeks. I have toyed with leaving my license alone until I must renew it, and producing the Board of Election’s acknowledgment of my change of address.


Then I think of that pesky Republican poll worker who challenged me at the last presidential election. I did face him down with a well used “Listen, young man”, but I don’t want to take a chance. Tomorrow I’ll get the driver’s license updated.

25 comments:

  1. LOL- Yep- it would be just your luck that the 'pesky young man' would be there an d recognize YOU, too. xo Diana

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  2. So much paper work with moving. The license is an important part of that for sure!

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  3. We voted by absentee ballot. It was the easiest and fastest voting process I have ever experienced. I am so impressed with how helpful and facilitating the early voting clerks were with answering questions about electronic registration and mailing in ballots. As they say in Chicago "Vote early. Vote often." ;-)

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  4. A good reason not to move...so much to change. It's the reason my wife decided to not change her name to mine...first off who cares, second she would have had to change 100 different records. We do get some knowing smirks when we check into a hotel with her name on the reservation and my name on the credit card.

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  5. I think privacy laws prevent (at least in principle) one organisation informing another about a change of address here. Which is a shame, because it could be very useful.
    No photo ID needed to vote here.
    Your current term finishes in 2020? Wow. I do hope you can slow down before that. At least a bit.

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  6. What I like about living in such a small town is that there is no polling intimidation here. I sympathize about the address change. It is a pain in the neck to try to remember all of the places that need to be notified.

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  7. Wow, that's a lot of money to renew or replace a driver's license. Here in Arizona, and I find it absolutely amazing, if you are under a certain age (60) and you get a license, it will last close to 40 years. You just have to go in every 12 years for an eye check and a new picture (not sure the cost of that, but getting the license is so inexpensive, barely 30 dollars). You can renew your car registration for 5 years (1 year, 2 years, 5 years increment) at a reduced rate, but if you sell, total the car, etc., you don't get money back from registration paid. Weird. There's a bit amount of money that could be generated with having the license last shorter, not sure of their reasoning.

    What I find amazing with the mail and forwarding is we are getting mail from hubby's deceased parents of close to 5 years at our present address. Different companies are finding a new potential address for them. We tried to have their mail stopped but virtually impossible to do.

    betty

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  8. Here in Australia you don't need to replace your licence or photo ID card when you move. For a smaller fee they will print you out a tiny new address sticker to place on the back of your licence.
    Why not ask if they can do that for you?

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  9. Hari om
    Like in Oz, UK laws prevent cross-pollination of address updates and it's a real pest at such times as these, but think I prefer it to the alternative! Atvleast you are fully 'you' again... YAM XX

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  10. Seems that every single thing we have to do 'officially' these days oosts money!

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  11. We've changed addresses so seldom that we haven't had that problem. But my son's old apartment address comes up as mine occasionally. I've thought of correcting this since I've never lived at that address, but afraid it just might cause more confusion... so have ignored it. I did have to change my middle name to my maiden name on my passport as they now want all your ID's to match and that's the way it's written on my driver's license and voter's registration card. You may be smart in getting your license changed to your new address to avoid confusion.

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  12. We spent so much money changing licenses and car registrations when we moved to Florida. Such a scam. On the upside, your "Listen, young man!" has made my day.

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  13. Since we don't have a physical address these days we have all our mail sent to a mail service in Texas... they get around the PO box problem by assigning us a number. (some businesses will not send mail or packages to a PO)... makes life interesting. But when we move from state to state (or country to country) we don't have to change our address. Just e-mail or call the mail service and have them mail what mail we've accumulated and send it on to us.

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    1. We do the same thing - a mail drop in Texas with an actual street address and they provide a forwarding service when we want to have our accumulated packages and mail sent to us. We do maintain a residential address in Texas and a Post Office Box there too. But we have only spent about 20 nights in Texas in the last 15 years.

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  14. In the UK you change your drivers license address on line, for nothing. When I moved three years ago I paid £52 to have my mail redirected by the Post Office to my new address for two years which is the maximum you can use this service. As each piece of mail came through, redirected, I sent the sender my new address. I reckoned that by the end of two years I would have caught every piece of mail that came to me, ever. It seems to have been £52 well spent. I did not want even junk mail in my name going to the new owners of my former house because junk mail often has all your details completed for all to see or use.

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  15. We're in a pickle in OK with our driver's licenses. Seems they aren't up to snuff for homeland security so we now have to get a passport to fly in the US. Those aren't cheap either.

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  16. The best plan is definitely to change your license. No sense giving the 'powers that be' any give over you if you don't have to.

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  17. I'd change it, too, on the principle of "better safe than sorry." And I MUST start practicing my "listen, young man" speech opening!!

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  18. Did you wag a finger at the young man as well? You are a warrior.

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  19. I finally changed the last name on my voter registration card about a month ago. It only took me six years to do it. I didn't have a problem when I voted because I used my ID from the University of Illinois. I didn't want to take any chances this time, though, because I no longer look anything like that photo on the ID. Strange that no one seemed to care that it was an Illinois ID.

    Love,
    Janie

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  20. I remember a poll worker telling my brother he couldn't vote in 2008 and five minutes later it was "no problem". That's why I never trusted the new Voter ID laws. Always something they can "bring up" to prevent a person from voting.

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  21. WOW! Didn't think about all of those address changes that have to be made. I am looking forward to voting. Best dust off my DL and make sure it is all ready for the photo ID thing!

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