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Thursday, December 10, 2015

The eye of the squirrel

Over the last two or three weeks we have watched one determined squirrel work through an expensive block of bird seed that we call "the good stuff."

I begrudge the squirrel every morsel. Opportunistic or not, I bought that for the birds, not fat rodents that can feed from the ground.

I've yelled at it, and send it scampering across the road. One morning I pursued it, blowing the car's horn. Of course it was unimpressed.

Here it is at noon, when I came home from work, cleaning up the last of the goods from the red covered feeder.

Got him with the phone camera.

The girls put the hot peper block in tonight.

I'll let you know.


As we discussed the learning experience awaiting this squirrel, I realized that last year, when this was not a problem, that feeder was a couple of hooks around the tree.

On a more slender branch.

But, we'll give it a taste before we move the feeder.

As I cropped the picture down, I see what may be The Great Squirrel, giving me the stink eye.

Oh, well. 

21 comments:

  1. It only takes the squirrel here a couple of days to eat the honey and seed block that goes into the bird feeder. They are certainly greedy little fellows.

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  2. I'd like to see that squirrel after it takes the first mouthful of pepper :-(

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  3. Knowing at how organised you are Joanne, I am very surprised that you haven't taught your squirrel to read ?

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  4. I'd give you the stink eye, too, if you took away easy eating.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. HAHAHA - Janie, you said precisely what I was thinking :)

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  5. We never win in our war against the squirrels.

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  6. How funny! I'll admit I've had the same feelings as you about those who "aren't really deserving"... but will also admit that as years went by, I quit making judgments about who should or who shouldn't be reaping the rewards of my generosity. The big thing is... I'm still having a big problem reconciling my grandkids apparent feelings to our generosity... I really know in my heart that those squirrels are going to take advantage of whatever food comes their way... no thank you note written and placed on the feeder. So... why am I disappointed when the grandkids pretty much do the same damned thing? Gifts should be given without wanting anything in return... so I'm told.

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  7. It is the pigeons here. Who flood the feeder and do their best to ensure that the weight of numbers means nothing else gets a look in. Good luck.
    And I am hoping for a photo of that first mouthful...

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  8. My husband hates it when he sees the squirrels and raccoons eating out of one of the bird feeders. He also resents it when the different species of birds eat out of the wrong feeders also. No matter what you do, Mother Nature will win and animals of all kinds will try to survive as best they can.

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  9. I think I might have mentioned this before on your blog, but a previous neighbor fed the birds; squirrels would come to his feeder; he would capture them, relocate them, no squirrels for a bit but they always found their way back. I guess they are very determined. So far no squirrels here (weird I know). Let us know if the hot pepper works.

    betty

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  10. So far the squirrels here have left the suet alone. We have a large baffle over the hanger and they can't (yet) figure out how to get to it!

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  11. I hope the squirrel gets the message before he burns his tongue off.

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  12. I think the pepper will do it, we used pepper spray in our engines in Florida to keep the squirrels from chewing wiring they can be very destructive sharpening their teeth.

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  13. Oh, let it be... mother nature knows who needs most.

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  14. Good luck. They are relentless.

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  15. I wish I could figure out a way to keep them off the tea cup.

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  16. Well, what can I say but good luck!

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  17. Luckily this is something we rarely see at our bird table. I would resent it too Joanne.

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  18. I love that phrase: giving me the stink eye. So midwest, haven't heard it for a while.
    There were some cats running loose not too long ago, doing their business under our ficus tree. Red pepper and old (been in the cabinet since some Christmas project) cloves--seemed to work.

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  19. I saw "The Great Squirrel" also at my first look, Joanne, and thought: how strange - it is too big to be true. (What happened!) Then I saw the "normal" and apparently grey one.
    On the balcony there are the doves which are the problem - fat ones, unimpressed by shooing, and flying five metres away to the next tree, sniggering, and then come back.

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  20. We've used the term "stink eye" in Hawaii too.

    As for squirrels, when we lived in Illinois, we used a bird feeder than had a slippery plastic dome over the feeder.

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