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Sunday, May 17, 2015

Buy button

I'm turning over a story about on line buying.
I've read Google may add a "buy button" to searches.

Earlier in the month, cleaning up the vestiges of the virus mess on my computer, my computer wizard convinced me to switch to my google email, and I acquiesced, noting google soon may own the earth, and in exchange for telling me what I want to know in a flash, it may be an even exchange.

"It's the future," said my wizard, who is 31 years younger. 

There you have it.

Then it quit raining and I went out to take pictures of raindrops on plants.
This actually is not another garden post this week.

It's about a discovery.

Raindrops on the columbine that reseeded after the awful winter.



Raindrops on the Solomon's seal.


Pig's nasturtiums.
I wish they would bloom!



The girl with the shiny hair pulled some weeds.


She had come outside to install her Christmas present.



The girl with the boots went to work.



I asked her if the gerbera daises were in yet.

Yes, they were.
So, Laura and I exercised our buy button and brought one home for lamb.




Laura filled the watering can at the now overflowing rain barrel,


And watered lamb's daisy.



Then she turned round and said "Look. Water does not stick to nasturtium leaves. There are no drops on them."



Go back and look at my picture of pig's nasturtiums when the rain ended.
There are no rain drops.




26 comments:

  1. Egad! You may have an important scientific discovery on your hands!

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  2. How amazing. I wonder why not.
    Love your columbine (grannie's bonnet I knew them as when a child). Also love the fox glove, the solomon's seal and the allium? blooming with it.
    And your built in weeder.

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  3. Are those giant allium I spy? how wonderful all the flowers you have. I've planted a few perennials this week, we shall see. a buy button would be nice.

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  4. I feel like you're writing to me from my future, as we have NOTHING near blooming yet, and with the cold temps and mercurial weather, flowers are but a dream. Naturally, the weeds are thriving.

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  5. Great new header. Laura is a budding botanist. She certainly is observant about nasturtium behavior and probablymore than this. . --- barbara

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  6. Great new header. Laura is a budding botanist. She certainly is observant about nasturtium behavior and probablymore than this. . --- barbara

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  7. Well, whaddya know ... Good for Laura for being that observant! I really like your pig and lamb; it's like seeing old friends again to see them in your post after that long winter.

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  8. That is interesting about the rain drops. I do like the gerbera daisies; so colorful!! Not sure about the buy button, could be dangerous to someone who is prone to impulsive spending.

    betty

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  9. You have a budding botanist here. Very bright.

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  10. Odd about raindrops not sticking in nasturtium leaves. I remember a peach tree at the back of our yard that had a whole carpet of nasturtiums under and I can't recall ever seeing water caught on the leaves. Laura's Christmas present is pretty and I like the gerbera daisies too.

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  11. You can eat those nasturtium blossoms, right? I thought that's what somebody told me. I love those gerbera daisies. I wish I could have them here. They don't seem to do well here for some reason. Then again, maybe it's just my brown thumb.

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  12. Pretty bright Gerbera for lamb & hope pig gets some flowers !

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  13. Hari OM
    I have some great shots of rain which stuck to nasturtium leaves - but most it rolls off, this is true... To Kay above - you can eat every part of the nasturtium plant; the flowers are great in salads (Honey/pepper), the leaves are also good salad make a great 'salsa/pesto' - very peppery; the seeds are pickled to make capers..... Yum...... YAM xx

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  14. I had the most wonderful nasturtiums about two years back, many different colours but they all died and haven't come back, I do miss them.
    Merle...........

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  15. I did not know that about nasturtium. Interesting. And rain? I hate to complain, last Summer was right next door to drought and we needed the rain. At first. But, daily? No, thanks. Liv has had more softball games canceled this year than any other and Bing is running out at the first glimpse of the sun to get the lawn mowed (which is the most lush and green ever) before it starts up again.

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  16. We need some of your rain. When we get some, I will check out my nasturtiums.

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  17. What a great observer, Laura is! And now all your readers have learned something as well!

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  18. so I guess the email address I have for you is no good now? and funny about the nasturtium leaves. I never noticed that before.

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  19. What a sweet post! I love your flowers.

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  20. The header--lilies of the valley? My grandmother had a line of those along the north side of her house. Can still remember the fragrance. She always pinned a sprig on her dress when they were blooming.

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    Replies
    1. The header is Solomon's Seal. But--my great-grandmother had a bed of lily of the valley. I remember standing in her tiny back yard and smell, smell, smelling them.

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  21. I like to see young folks taking an interest in gardening, nice photo's.

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  22. Google will make raincoats from nasturtium leaves..get the idea patented FAST!
    Jane x

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  23. Even if it is not a gardening post I loved all the pictures! You are so lucky that your grands take an interest and help!

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  24. I think lamb will be pleased with his/her daisy.

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