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Thursday, October 16, 2014

And in conclusion,

I finished the last two sections of heddles this morning,


Then threaded the reed.


Tied onto the cloth beam, or take up beam.
Cloth beam because it's where the woven cloth accumulates.
Take up beam because it takes up the woven cloth.


And began weaving a length of M's and O's.
Look at those excellent selvages!


M's and O's is a block weaving pattern.
Etymologists say the name came out of Finland, which has a very long history of weaving.
For undiscovered reasons, its Finnish name turned into an Anglo-Irish name for drunkards who stay up all night and come home with the owls. That's as much as I remember.
It makes more sense to me than M's and O's, as I've never seen either.

This length has a long way to go to see how well it can become a scarf.
The kind my stylish friends wear in loops around their necks.
To test how it fulls, this length will probably stop at four or five feet, not six or eight,
and become a pretty little moebius neck drape.

And now, Fanny Price and I will quietly leave the room.

Am I the only one of us who know who Fanny Price is?




35 comments:

  1. Well I'll admit I don't know who Fanny Price is... I thought you meant Fanny Brice of the Zeigfield Follies and that era... I'll have to wait and see what others know. I'm still fascinated with that weaving process... what patience you have!

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  2. Look at the fall color beautiful, you've once again lost me on the weaving terminology, what is the Finnish word? You know my husband is Finnish. I have no idea who Fanny Price is either.

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  3. I admit I googled Fanny Price. I didn't know who she was beforehand and maybe still don't know unless she was a character in a book.

    Good for you for getting everything up and running! I like the weaving it does!

    betty

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  4. That's quite a nice pattern. Now I'm off to google Fanny Price. The name is familiar but that's all.

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  5. She's a stranger to me I'm afraid. Your set up looks good.

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  6. Ah Joanne...a perfect choice of name for your new loom. Fannie Price was the poor unfortunate waif who was sent to "Mansfield Park" in that very excellent novel by Jane Austen. In the end she turned into a lovely and dependable young woman...as (hopefully) will your newly acquired loom also become a favorite.

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  7. Ahem, the said Miss Price is in my least favourite novel. I will say this publicly and hope I'm not lynched...I really do not like Jane Austen's books at all.
    Jane x

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    1. Mansfield Park was my least favorite, too. I have to be in a certain mood to reread Austen. I loved the irony of the name; the loom was an orphan, she came at an exceptional price, her name already is Fanny, and so many people shudder at the thought of Jane Austen that I had to do it.

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  8. It seems like so much work, but once started, I imagine it is fun and really satisfying work.

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  9. That pattern in absolutely beautiful!

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  10. It looks great so far. very skillful to get those excellent selvedges. I guess you aren't rusty. I go too long between commissions and I wonder if I've ever done this before. I'm curious though, a 36" wide scarf?

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    1. The loom can hold up to 36", weaving width. I used 10 2" bouts with 26 threads each, and used 26" in the reed. However, everything is under tension, so about 10% of the length and a small bit of width is lost to that. Then there is another inch or two of draw in as I weave. And finally, this is cotton, like the towels, and will shrink considerably in the washer and dryer. I'm still considering how I will do that part of the process, as I've spent twenty years weaving durable fabric, not light scarves. We'll see.

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    2. I didn't include the rest of the math. I can lose up to 20 % in the washing machine. I expect this 26" piece to come down to well under 20 ". I asked my stylish friend to take off her scarf for me to look at. It was six feet long and the width of her arm And then she put it back on, lickey split.

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    3. I can't wait to see the results of your twinkling fingers and Fanny's reeds and heddles and all the other parts of her that i don't understand!

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  11. Do you walk through Mansfield Park, Fanny and you? Well clad in your beautiful scarf? Congratulöation to your weaving done!

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  12. I admit I don't know anything about weaving, but I do love *cotton*. I knit 100% cotton dish cloths for myself and friends and love the way it washes and dries.... so I imagine your cotton weaved cloths are fantastic.

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    1. I knitted myself a dishcloth and found it far too pretty to be washing dishes with, it now sits on a small chest of drawers with a varnished box on top.

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  13. What a lovely piece. It must be like gossamer when finished.

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  14. Hari OM
    Your Fanny ain't so shy and retiring I'd say... if you'll forgive the innuendo! Oh you are going to have soooo much fun, you two together. YAM xx

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  15. Dear Joanna, it all looks so intricate. And what patience must be needed to do all the threading.

    As to Fanny Price--is that the name of a character in a Trollope novel????? Peace.

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  16. I'm impressed. I can crochet...about three different stitches. Woo hoo.

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  17. Again, just gorgeous. But as a buyer and wearer of expensive scarves-and that is one- those are hand washed, laid flat to dry and steamed. And never worn when eating or for anything nasty, those are the church, dinner, theater scarves.

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  18. I had to check on wikipedia about Fanny Price, too ... did you name all of your looms? Pretty pattern; good luck!

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  19. You know I weave all the time but this is so far beyond me. I admire your work, your use of language, history of what you are doing and now glad to see you back at a loom. I will be one to purchase your compulsion and wear it proudly. When and where will I be able to find these labors of love and patience?

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  20. Fun little tutorial on the intricacies of fabric. We have so much around us that we take for granted and it's good to be reminded such things as cloth don't just make themselves. Looking forward to seeing more from Fannie and you.

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  21. Good grief, that looks harder than hell! And how intricate! I received your gifts by the way and I ADORE them. Check out my blog to see a photo of them....

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  22. How very, very beautiful. And skilled.
    And your tea-towels (dish cloths) are getting a work out here. And getting better all the time. Thank you.

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  23. It is so neat that you are working with a loom. This reminds me of India a lot. Thanks for sharing.

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  24. I feel like I'm at the knee of a Master when I read this type of post. Teach me more! We are still so in love with our towels over here. I'm almost ready to stop sleeping with them clutched to my cheek.

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  25. I cheated -- I looked her name up on Wiki. Now I know -- although I had heard the name before I really never knew who she was. Getting a loom ready to start weaving seems to require a mathematician. I'm sure your scarf drape will be a beauty! Really like your Fall header. -- barbara

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  26. Do weavers know when they start how much math is involved? NOT...I wish I had listened to Mrs Steadman in high school. You are amzing. Like how many pounds in a gallon of water..DAH>>

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  27. Whew! That looks like a lot of work getting everything set up but the end result will be well worth it. I already love the scarf pattern. Are you making an infinity scarf or just a long one that you can loop aroun and around?

    As for Fanny Price, would you believe that Mansfield Park was the first Jane Austen book I'd read and yet I do not remember Ms. Price :-(

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  28. That looks so complicated. It must take a lot of experience to set the whole thing up!

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  29. Wow, Joanne! I just recently ordered a woven bedspread for one of the bedrooms, and I liked it so much, I ordered another for the other bed. If I tried to assemble the loom, it would be just one giant mess.

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