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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

What was that masked stuff?


I have orders. Wear the tea strainer to bed for one week.

Wear the wrap arounds to step out.

Use three different drops eight times a day.

Weekly appointments. At the third week the doctor will measure for the corrective glasses lens. I did not spend the extra thousand something for the lens to correct my awful astigmatism as I still need reading glasses. I have worn glasses for the last sixty three years; too late to change. Not to mention, the corresponding extra thousand something for the other eye. I’m coming out ahead here.

The magnificent staff piled on hot blankets yesterday. When the doctor remarked the nurse said they stopped when I no longer regretted leaving my down comforter at home. I heard the doctor chuckle.

I heard everything. I saw red and blue, yellow and green in the bright lights. I heard the doctor say “This pupil is just too small; I need to use a spring.”

“Wow. A spring. How neat,” my placid self observed.

In the middle of the night I woke up. Did he take it out?

Another chuckle today. “Of course I did.”

“What was that stuff?”

“It’s like valium. No, it’s like propofal. No, darn, I just blocked on it.”

As soon as my right eye sees properly, the left one gets it.  The right eye is arguing with the left over which will process color, only a few hours post tea strainer. My sister says that would make her crazy. It is interesting to see the electric blue office scrubs of the clinic staff suddenly have a patch of muddy blue swim across. They weren't electric blue last week, I can tell you that.




33 comments:

  1. Oh I can SO relate to everything you wrote.... I had mine done at the Arena Eye Center in Columbus, OH... but my procedures were 2 years apart... one eye just didn't ripen as fast. I had to make a chart to figure out when to put what drops in... they seemed to change every day or so... hey... those spreadsheets come in handy! Congratulations for coming through it so well... the best is yet to come.

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  2. Joanne, you are so good at putting it all in words. I experienced it - but never would have been able to describe it like you do! Hang in there.

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  3. Someday I will have to have your same operation. I am a terrible patient as I do not like medical visits of any kind. Avoidance is my mantra. You seem to have it all under control -- rate your experience for us please -- barbara

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    1. On a scale of one to ten, I'll give the return of color a hundred. Maybe a thousand. I cannot describe the experience, except WoW. It's not a bell ringing epiphany, but closer to realizing colors were that color in childhood and completely unappreciated.
      So, the nice staff get the hundred for bringing the hot blankets. At the second one I said just put it on top, and she said, Oh no, you'll like this much better, and in a flash had the new one under the first one. At the third one I made the goose comforter remark, that she passed on to the doctor.
      I never went past pot in the day, so I don't know what different drugs can do. My sister says this seems to be what her dentist uses. She knows the root canal may be hurting, but absolutely does not give a damn. Whatever may have been frightening in the procedure was just interesting, like a new view around the bend. It did not hurt then or now; the most discomfort was the removal of the tape over the tea strainer.
      I'd say, if it's in your future enjoy what it gives you.

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    2. I find that so disconcerting, the idea of there being pain but not caring but then I guess that is also how narcotics work. Your brain thinks there is no pain so there is no pain. I could easily get stuck there for awhile. :)

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    3. Nothing ever hurt, except the tape coming off my cheek. They told me to take Tylenol, but nothing ever hurt. Except the stinkin' tape.

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  4. Wow , you must be going through a lot. You are brave. I wish that you get back to seeing like the way you used to. Ameen.

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  5. People used to drip Bella Donna into their eyes in the old days. Good luck with coping with it all, Joanne.

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    1. I thought Bella Donna was to be more provocatively beautiful. Swooning. Languishing. Didn't Sherlock use it, too,when he wasn't on opium. Anyway, not to worry; I'm just fine.

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    2. It widened the pupils, and still does - if you're brave enough to use it. Personally, I swear by Spanish Fly, but you wouldn't want to hear that.

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  6. I love heated blankets, but not enough to go to the hospital for them. I wish you well.

    Love,
    Janie

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  7. I didn't hear a thing during the procedure...I think I prefer it that way. Ain't the colors grand!

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  8. The colours! The colours! The awesome, awesome colours!!!!! So happy for you! oxoxoxo

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  9. Hari OM
    That's good - you're talking about the next time. Or is that the meds talking???? Love that I can see your tablet in your glasses. Way cool gra'mmaa!! YAM xx

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  10. You are performing quite the service here as some of us may have this in our futures and you are easing some fears.

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  11. Perpetua on Perpetually in Transit has just had her cataract done and you both remark how suddenly colours become almost new to you...

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  12. I had eye surgery (not cataract).The numbing drops were so good that they could have poked out my eyes and I wouldn't have known. Don't we live in amazing times?!
    Oh, Joanne..wait until the summer when colours abound!
    Jane x

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  13. thanks for sharing your experience. Too stupid for me to say "eye opening"? Wish you well.

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  14. Heal well and soon. After this is all over, it may be a dim memory.

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  15. Good luck Joan. I had one eye done 2 years ago but decided to wait for the other.

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  16. I've always tried to tell you about the drugs..Wonderful advancement and so much more sanitary that biting a bullet..imagine what help you will be on the next color fiber excursion.

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  17. Just think how wonderful everything will look when you are finished.
    Merle....................

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  18. Even if you did not spend the money for the upgraded lens, you might be able to see fine with just the the ones you have and only need reading glasses. They will give you a prescription and tell you to go to their store which is usually located in their office and sell you expensive glasses. When I questioned them about that, they did tell me that yes, all I needed was drug store reading glasses.

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  19. I'm glad everything went fine and you're healing. I'm looking forward to hearing how great it is when you're totally healed.

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  20. I love that you have colour again - and smiled at the kindness of nursing staff (but shuddered at heated blankets). Hope tomorrow is even better.

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  21. How neat to rediscover the world again as you can vibrantly once again see the colors! The temporary inconveniences will all be worth it!

    betty

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  22. Three different drops eight times a day? I'd go nuts, I can barely get one drop in.
    I bet you were surprised to see electric blue scrubs. I didn't realise you weren't able to see colours before.

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  23. My goodness, it sounds like the lyrics to a Beatles song. The best of luck with your continuing treatment.

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  24. Oh, dear Joanne - there is always tomorrow. Hugs

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  25. Oh my, and you're still writing. Maybe to keep yourself sane through all those meds, right?!?

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  26. Dear Joanne, I'm always amazed when I read a posting like this one of yours today. Amazed at what can be done to help us see better, hear better, walk better . . . so many things better physically than our parents were given. Peace.

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