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Sunday, October 6, 2013

We will always have yuccas



 (Apologies to Bogart and Bergman)


We dug out several yucca plants from near their point of origin,


nestled there in the curve of the side walk,
and planted them in front of the pampas grass, 
where the girls are weeding.

If we need to replace a transplant
we know where to find one.

They just keep growing.


Things are still growing.  A new raspberry plant.


Flowers long past their prime are still blooming.



And making me smile.

Then we went to the bird seed store
and came back with replacements for our hanging baskets.



I still can't part with this basket, so pictures will follow another day.


Finch feeder.
At the end, out of sight, bluebird feeder. Or orioles. Or robins.
I can't imagine what they see in meal worms.


The piece de resistance!
A squirrel assault closes the seed holes. How cool is that!


A very good day.
Thanks to Hamilton for taking the picture.

Laura is curled in the chair reading the bird book.










24 comments:

  1. About those meal worms??? I've been seeing packages of (dehydrated?) meal worms in the feed and seed aisles of feed stores. Who eats them? How does the bird know it used to be a delicacy? Is it still? We've put out some kind of "used to be" worm for bluebirds (in Texas) but never got a taker. Along that line... I've put out oriole feeders in Ohio and my husband still makes jokes about those. (yeah.. no takers).... So... my question is... are black oiler sunflower seeds and niger seeds (for the finches) enough? Dog-gone... we're in too many places in the USA in a 12 month period to figure out what's the best thing to feed the critters. Looks like you've got it figured out.

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    1. I only know what the tiny little lady at the bird store tells me, and hope Emily and Laura remember it on the way home. I bought a little bag of meal worms. If nobody wants them, we can put orange slices and other stuff I don't recall for the Orioles. I got niger for the finches and mixed for the rest of the birds--peanuts to sunflower. We'll just see what comes round, and fine tune as we get smarter. Kinda like the garden this summer.

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    2. I always thought mealworms were for goldfish and turtles.

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  2. Looks like a good day. Very clever the squirrel hole covering thing...can't wait to see the pictures of a squirrel figuring out how to defeat it and get a good feed.

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  3. Your garden looks wonderful - mine is still in the weedy stage (can't get the staff)
    I love the photo of you and your granddaughters. Well done Hamilton.

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  4. Everything looks great! It's always wonderful to celebrate the beauty of fall before winter comes. I love seeing the warmth and comfort of your loving family.

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  5. Gorgeous. But beware of the triffid raspberries. I swear that they are on a crusade for world domination. Only yesterday I discovered more coming up in a bed which I was certain I had eradicated them from.

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    1. They can commandeer every square inch of the bed I have them in, and next summer I will lie on my back and eat raspberries until my eyes turn red.

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    2. I am a big, big fan of raspberries myself. As are the birds. Which might partially account for their presence in EVERY garden bed.

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  6. Your young people did a great job on the garden, didn't they.

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  7. I need to replace my hanging baskets also. Must be nice to have all that great help! And I love that last pic!!

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  8. I surpose meal worms are like roast chicken to us, even if I was a bird I don't think I would fancy them.
    Merle.... ........ ........

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  9. I don't know about birds, but trout seem to love meal worms. My hubby buys them by the dozens to tempt the fish into chowing down on a hook so we can chow down on fish. It works very well. The bad part is when he leaves live worms in his coat pocket and they hatch into huge bugs. Yikes! Love the smiles from you and your girls.

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  10. That last picture is wonderful! And the kids must get a great sense of satisfaction when they look at how beautiful the gardens are now.

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  11. I like the picture of your granddaughters with you. Neat to have bird feeders to see what birds come to visit and sample the delicious goodies set out for them.

    betty

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  12. Oh, I LOVE the photo of the three of you! So adorable!!! And I can't think of a better way to spend the day than filling and hanging birdie feeders and admiring the last of the summer garden!

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  13. Hari Om
    ...it's all been said - I merely second it all!! Have a great week. YAM xx

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  14. I love that last photo of you and the girls, you're all so happy.
    It's nice when flowers hang on and on and on, you can still think and do summery things when flowers are about even if the air is getting cooler.

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  15. My hens used to devour meal worms ! Lots still blooming in the garden here; it was like summer yesterday.
    Lovely happy photo.

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  16. Lovely photos! I like to look at flowers and birds, too.

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  17. I've been wondering how to keep the squirrels away. I don't mind so much the feeder in the front but when they jump onto the teacup, the end up scattering more sunflower seeds than they eat.

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  18. I love that picture of you and the girls.

    Pearl

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  19. Beautiful garden, Joanne. Even more beautiful the picture of you and the girls!

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  20. That is one great picture Grandma, and one beautiful garden.

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